Final Proof–Sisters of Mercy

I have finally returned to the block print inspired by Leonard Cohen’s Sisters of Mercy. Though at first glance this proof looks the same as the earlier one, I have added a few details to the mouths and hands that I felt were needed. And I’m happy with the results.

The ink I’ve been using on these rough copies is actually a deep violet though it looks nearly black. So my next step will be to pick up white ink and see if adding some will bring out the violet more. I’ll show you the results once I’ve done that.

 


Lino and Leonard

After Leonard Cohen died, I remembered an interview I heard a few years ago with the Iranian Canadian journalist, Maziar Bahari. He had been imprisoned in Iran and falsely accused of being a spy. He was subjected to torture and didn’t know if he would live or die. One night, he had a dream that brought to mind Leonard Cohen’s song, The Sisters of Mercy. Though he had never been a fan of Cohen’s  music, he felt that song had a major role in saving his life. Through it, he found a place within himself that his captors and torturers could not destroy.

Part of that interview was replayed this fall after Leonard Cohen died. I had never been drawn to The Sisters of Mercy, but as I listened to the words this autumn, I knew they would help me deal with this time of darkness in the world. So, I’ve learned the words and have begun doing some artwork related to the song. After doing several sketches, I finally arrived at one that I wanted to use.  As I  looked at the sketch, I could see it as a linocut and I decided to return to linocutting to create the image. I gave up linocutting around 20 years ago, though it was my favourite medium, because of repetitive strain from carving over the years. Now I considered the roving pain I have as an elder. And I thought, I already have pain, so I’m not going to be afraid of it. I’m going to return to printmaking–something I love dearly. I have found a soft lino substitute that can still have crisp lines cut into it. I’m experimenting with that and with working for shorter periods of time at a stretch. So far, this is working.

Here’s 2 photos of the carving in progress. I’m using carving tools really made for children, but that work fine! I’ll show you the print once I finish it.

Good holidays to you.

Oh the sisters of mercy, they are not departed or gone. They were waiting for me when I thought that I just can’t go on. And they brought me their comfort and later they brought me this song. Oh I hope you run into them, you who’ve been travelling so long.–Leonard Cohen

mercylino2

mercylino


Reading Old Prints, 3

The most recent origami booklet I’ve made is from a woodcut I carved and printed in 1973. It’s called Forth Form Variation and is from a series I did playing around with several shapes. I used two pine boards that I lined up to make the whole image. I have loved trees since childhood and I enjoyed making an image that felt powerful to me.

When I measured the actual print size, I saw that if I cut the print in four, I could wind up with different sized square booklets. After I made the first cut, I flipped the parts of the original around and placed them next to each other to create different designs. I’ve got a photo of one of these arrangements below.  This is a process I’ve always enjoyed. I used a variation of it in some of my prints. I’d print the original block in different colours and overlap the colours in two stages, orienting them in opposite directions.  I loved the surprising designs that emerged.

Here’s also photos of the first of the four booklets. I kept it quite simple, only adding a bit of colour with Pitt markers.

And late last week I uploaded the transformed print from my July 20th post to my etsy shop.

Fourth Form Variation, Woodcut, ©1973, Lily S. May under previous married name, Susan Barsel-Herman.

Fourth Form Variation, Woodcut, ©1973, Lily S. May under previous married name, Susan Barsel-Herman.

FormVariation4thRearrng

FormVariation4thBklt

FormVariation4thPgs

 


Healing Power of Autumn

This is a linocut I made in the 1970s under my previous married name, Susan Barsel-Herman, to express my love of autumn.  I called the print The Healing Power of Autumn.

HealingPower


At Peace Linocut

Last month I came upon a copy of a print of mine that I’d remembered over the years but thought was lost to me. The print was part of a very small edition and I had no copies left. I found it in my mother’s apartment after her death.  It was a lovely and timely surprise to see it again.

It’s hard to recall exactly what I was thinking when I made the linocut. But I believe I was influenced by my brother’s interest in yoga and meditation and my own desire for peace. An apt image for a time of change.

At Peace linocut. ©1974, Lily S. May under former married name.

At Peace linocut. ©1974, Lily S. May under former married name.


Linocut: Birth of Goddess, ii

Here’s a variation on the theme of the birth of imaginary goddesses. This is another linocut that I made in 1974, again under my former married name. 

Linocut--Birth of Goddess

Linocut, Birth of the Goddess, ii. Copyright 1974, Lily S. May under former married name.


Raining Cats and Dogs

Linocut DetailOur cold weather gave way to warmer temperatures earlier this week. And then yesterday and early today, came a big rain.

So in keeping with the weather, here’s a linocut I made many years ago. It’s a small print called Raining Cats and Dogs, made under my birth name, Susan Barsel, ©1984.

Linocut