The Nature of Making Art

I have kept journals–diaries–on and off for the past 40 or more years. In the 1990s and early 00s, I hand wrote a huge amount in dozens and dozens of lined notebooks–mostly recording my dreams and feelings but also world events and my activities. I’ve been working on a big project, going through my journals from those years and massively editing them. By that I mean, I’ve been tearing out and shredding large portions of them while noting what I was going through at the time. Now, this may seem ghastly to some people, but it is extremely liberating to me. I am creating more room for myself at my current age, while remembering, but not holding onto, what my younger self experienced.

In the course of editing a journal this week, I saw an entry I wanted to record here. I wrote it in April of 1991 after attending an excellent painting workshop with the artist and teacher Sam Feinstein. I have always remembered the powerful nature of that workshop, but had forgotten his teachings about the nature of making art. This was my understanding of what he told us, as I wrote it in 1991:

About art making–you needn’t even believe in your creativity–do it as a way of expressing the life form that is particular to you, that is of nature and larger than you, that goes through you.  As a way of being authentic. Dreams and art are of the unconscious life force, bigger than us. Dreams are fleeting, art remains. Once a piece of art work is done, it is its own thing. It never was yours anyway. As its own thing, it is judged on its merits, apart from you.

Art is the spirit made visible through human beings reaching out from themselves, beyond themselves. Art is beyond our own feelings as we create.

Words to make art by!

 

The gouache painting above is one I made in the 1990s. I did it like a form of free association, attempting to allow whatever came to consciousness to find its way onto the page without censoring it.


Black Waterfall Poem Booklet

I’ve completed an accordion booklet with my writing about Milne’s Black Waterfall painting. You can see the initial idea in Poem for an Old Woodcut. There’s other related posts following that one. I decided to print my writing on thin Japanese paper and adhere it to the booklet.  Here’s some photos of it from different angles. I like seeing different parts of the print showing through the paper in the light.

 

milnebklt2

milnebklt4

milnebklt

 


A Poem for An Old Woodcut

As I continue turning some of my early prints into booklets, I’m playing around with words I might include with the prints. This last print I’ve been working with (the one that’s also in my previous post) has a lot of black ink in it.  And that got me thinking about some writing I did a few years ago. In 2014 I took a poetry writing workshop at the Art Gallery of Ontario.  After our meetings, I’d often wander around the Gallery, looking at various art works.  This prose and poem came out of one of those meanderings.  I’m contemplating the design of the booklet and will show it to you when I’ve completed it.

Here’s another photo of the woodcut I plan to use that I’ve cut down the middle.

FormVariation4thCut

And here’s the prose and poem:

Black Waterfall

On a day when the tomb-like qualities of the gallery seep into me too much, I enter the rooms of David Milne’s paintings looking for peace.  I find some here, away from the more flashy works of Lauren Harris and Frank Carmichael.  Milne’s are quieter, less assuming, but they give back to me, emitting life.

I stand looking at one that I like.  It’s called Black Waterfall, a scene in the woods by a small falls.  The water is, indeed, black, the colours subdued.  After many minutes, I am surprised to see what I hadn’t noticed: Milne, himself, at his easel in the upper left of the painting.  He’s the same colours as the trees, rocks and earth.  He has disappeared into the scene or become one with it.  I like the humility, the humour and the wisdom of his image, considering where the alienation from nature has taken humanity.

This is a painting I can carry with me, softening the dense traffic of the city, helping me inhale forested air where rivers flow, while the ghost of the artist amidst the trees silently witnesses my passing presence.

*

By the black waterfall

the painter has disappeared

into the trees, rocks and soil

where, being invisible,

he can more closely observe passersby

and the woods and water he’s depicting

camouflaged at his easel like a deer

but not bolting

steady of hand and sight

neither a conqueror

nor a slave

embodying a gentle way

to save a life.

©Lily S. May–May 2014


Reading Old Prints, 2

I continue turning some of my old prints into origami booklets. And, as so often happens, I’ve been changing the work in ways I didn’t first set out to do. I tried a few booklets with simple collages of some poetry I’ve written. Then, this morphed into bits of writing about the weather or a dream I’ve had. I’ve added colour to the prints with Pitt markers and am now enjoying a freer process than my first attempts.

Here’s another print (A Mask of the Goddess, 2 from 1974) in a pile of linocuts.  Then there’s some photos of the most recent booklet I’ve made from folding and cutting the entire print.

MaskGoddessPrintPile

 

Tigerdreamprintbook2

Tigerdreamprintbook

Tigerdreamprintbook3


The Change in Our Fortunes–Massively Edited

 

**aspenbarkTiny

Here’s what I originally wrote in this post:

Several years ago, I had a dream that made a great impression on me.  In it, I was at a retreat in the countryside on a grassy lawn with a forest at its edge. There I heard about a course being offered called The Care of Latent Kittens.  I planned to sign up for the course because I had always wanted to learn to work with animals.

A few months after the dream, I decided to write about this course and its mysterious animals. I wound up spending many months creating a story set in the future about an endangered species and efforts to save them and humanity from environmental catastrophe. Recently I looked at some of that writing again and decided to enlarge the work to include images. I’ll be printing the drawings and text soon, but also wanted to put the work out in digital form on the blog. This is the first chapter in a series I’ll be developing with some of the 14 scratchboard drawings I’ve made to go with the words. The drawings are not so much illustrations as attempts to reflect the atmosphere of the story.

However, I began further editing the writing yesterday (Feb. 25). During the process, I decided to remove all the writing that originally followed in this post while I work on it. So, here’s what’s left–a few of the drawings from the time of Latent Kittens.

**oakleafTiny

**cowrieshellTiny

**maskgoggleTiny

**shellTiny

**humanTiny

**feathersTiny


Scratchboard and Masks

I’ve been enjoying working on a series of scratchboard drawings to go with writing I did a few years ago. I hit upon scratchboard drawings because they can bear some resemblance to lino and woodcuts which I love but gave up making because of repetitive strain from carving. I made the three papier mache masks shown here in the 1990s. They’re the latest subjects of the drawings. When I’ve completed the project, I’ll show it to you. 

MasksScratchbd

 


The Unveiling of the Heart

Oil Pastel ©2009, Lily S. May

Oil pastel in a sketchbook, ©2009, Lily S. May

We are walking in a garden

we are blind to

though it bears our names.

And the suffering,

the suffering is great,

but the unveiling of the heart

is greater.

© 2015 Lily S. May